The Struts Sell Out The Marathon Music Works

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By Alma Reed

Written by Wes Lytz

Rockers The Struts jammed out to a SOLD OUT audience at Nashville’s Marathon Music Works Wednesday night. Here are the gory details:

Alternative rocker JJ WIlde opened the show, performing songs from her recently released debut EP ‘Wild Eyes, Steady Hands.’ Ms Wilde admits that while they weren’t planning to attend this show, they decided last minute to show up, pulling an all-night roadtrip and arriving just in time to perform the maiden set. If it had any ill effect on her voice, we couldn’t tell as JJ stuns with her trademark raspy voice. And though the songs are good, there’s a perceptible lack of chemistry between bandmates. Eitherway, JJ Wilde gets a large crowd fired up on a sweltering Wednesday night.

JJ Wilde

JJ Wilde

The Glorious Sons are on next. Young, rowdy and stylish, they fulfill the prophecy of the live rock and roll performance. Frontman Brett Emmons’ swagger evokes the spirit of a late 80s Axl Rose whose DNA was spliced to a few strands from an early 90s Eddie Vedder. The energy and conviction commands your attention and the burgeoning audience buys in. TGS’ enthusiasm is infectious as each band member zealously engages the crowd. Playing songs from their soon to be released ‘A War On Everything,’ the audience is sufficiently primed for the main event.

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

The Glorious Sons

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The stage backdrop is reminiscent of an in-between scenes transition from That 70s Show. The house lights dim and The Struts burst on stage like streamers from a confetti cannon. From the first snare beat, their presence extends to the back of the room just as quickly as it does to the front row. Their performance imbues elements of theatrics and choreography. If you didn’t know better, you might mistake their act for a touring Broadway musical. Highly entertaining, The Struts give the people what they want. Comparisons between Queen’s Freddie Mercury and vocalist Luke Spiller are too easy to make, as he gives away every last drop of sweat and energy he can possibly muster.

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts

The Struts open with “Primadonna Like Me” and “Body Talks” to an ecstatic audience. Mr Spiller takes a seat at the upright piano for their song One Night Only. This is followed by performances of “Dirty Sexy Money”, “Put Your Money On Me”, a cover version of “Dancing in the Street”, and an acoustic version of “Somebody New”.

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They close the show with the anthemic “Could Have Been Me”. Entertainment par excellence from start to finish. Make sure you see The Struts live and in concert the first chance you get.